IN-DEPTH: The Seiko Prospex ‘Turtle’ Diver

IN-DEPTH: The Seiko Prospex ‘Turtle’ Diver

Posted in Blog, dive-watch-reviews, Featured

The story in a second: The Seiko Turtle offers a winning combination of heritage and quality at a supremely wallet-friendly price. Seiko dive watches have a massive – at times fanatical – following. It’s these guys and gals who are responsible for giving the brand’s cryptically coded watches their colourful nicknames – the Tuna, Monster, Sumo and, in this case, the Turtle. Officially, the Turtles we’re looking at here are known as SRP775 (black gilt dial on bracelet), SRP773 (blue dial on bracelet) and SRP777 (black dial on silicone). From now on, collectively, we’ll just call them Turtles. But wait, there’s more. These SRP77 divers are actually reissues of the original Turtles – historic divers from the 6309 family, produced from 1976 until 1988. Not only is this new version a faithful homage to the original, it also represents nigh-on-unbeatable value for money. It was the broad, cushion-shaped case that inspired the watch’s nickname, because if you look at it from a distance and squint a little it resembles the shell of a turtle. Of course, the broad sides have a functional purpose as well, the ample flanks serving to protect the case, as well as the crown. As you might expect from a diver, overall it’s quite hefty, coming in at 44.3mm across and 14mm high, though the curves make it quite comfortable to wear. The bezel, which protects the Hardlex crystal, adds a lot of height as well as some contrasting texture, thanks to the double row of polished grips. The bezel is unidirectional, with quite a firm action, though it’s not in the same league as you’d see on higher priced divers. The dial I had a look at three different dial versions of the Turtle. Of these, the black dial/bezel SRP777 is the safest choice, while the SRP773 adds a discreet navy blue to the equation. But the most interesting option is the SRP775, with its gilt details, and gold bezel, dial text and hands. Colours aside, the dials all play from the same book, with a handset and large round indices  that are instantly recognisable to anyone familiar with Seiko Divers – much like the ample luminous material that’s also reassuringly in attendance. you can also find other combinations such as the SRP787 and the SRP789 , coke and bat man versions Text-wise, the Turtle has a lot going on, with brand up top, Prospex logo and ‘automatic diver’s 200m’ text down below. It’s a fairly busy layout but it seems to work, adding to the overall Seiko-ness of the watch. I particularly like the ‘Suwa sword’ detail – the sword-like shape that’s part of the 12 marker – which is a nice nod to vintage models, and ties in well to the lines coming out of the six and nine numerals. The movement One of the quirks of the older Seiko divers was that they couldn’t be hand-wound, and the seconds didn’t ‘hack’ (stop) when...

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BASIC REVIEW OF THE SEIKO MARINE MASTER 300 SBDX001

BASIC REVIEW OF THE SEIKO MARINE MASTER 300 SBDX001

Posted in Blog, dive-watch-reviews, Featured

Seiko Marine Master 300 ( SBDX001 ) The Seiko Marine Master 300 SBDX001 is Seiko’s high-end alternative for Rolex sport swatches. This might sound like a bold statement, but those who know this Seiko, will agree. Let us give you some more information about the Seiko Marine Master 300 or MM300 as it’s nicknamed by collectors. This is no ordinary Seiko; this Marine Master 300 is part of the ‘Prospex’ line of watches, Seiko’s upscale diver line that is only sold and marketed in Japan. There is another Marine Master in the Prospex line, but that one has a depth rating of 600 meters and has a spring drive movement. This Seiko Marine Master 300 is reference number SBDX001. Most dive watches designed for depths of 300 meters, like the Rolex Sea-Dweller or Omega Seamaster, are equipped with a helium/gas escape valve. Due to the superior seal this Seiko doesn’t need a helium/gas escape valve. The design is based on a more than 30-year old design, however everything is bigger and more robust compared to older (and most other) Seiko dive watches. With a height of 14.6 mm and a diameter of 44 mm, and weighing 209 gr on the bracelet (136 gr on the rubber strap), the monocoque case still wears comfortable. The movement is caliber 8L35, which is an undecorated and unadjusted version of the high-end Grand Seiko caliber 9S55. It’s rhodium-plated, has 26 jewels, beats at 28,800 vph (or 4 Hz), has 50 hours of power reserve, has a hacking function and has automatic winding. Compared to caliber 9S55 this caliber 8L35 has an increased balance wheel. Although Seiko says it’s regulated to -10 and +15 seconds, most owners report a daily deviation of well within COSC specifications. This Seiko movement does not seem to be hand-finished, so no beveled edges but machine finishing. The dial is matt black and features applied indices and Seiko’s magnificent Lumibrite fill on markers and hands. Lumibrite is Seiko’s own variant of Super Luminova....

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A REVIEW OF THE SEIKO SKX009 Dive Watch

Posted in Blog, Featured

Seiko SKX009 Dive Watch Aside from its popular “Pepsi Bezel”, the SKX009 Automatic Diver’s Watch from Seiko has a number of features that made it an instant classic. It runs on the 7S26 workhorse movement that beats at 21,600 beats per hour, complete with day and date features. This technology has played a big role in Seiko’s line of entry-level mechanical movements and best known for its durability and timekeeping reliability. The dial is dark blue with luminous hour and minute hands, topped off with a sweeping second hand for precision. The watch band is a rubber strap that goes well with water activities, but buyers can also opt for the stainless steel Jubilee bracelet if desired. A closer look at the Seiko SKX009 Dial and window The deep blue dial of the SKX009 is very legible with its white hour markers and sweeping second Seiko-SKX009-1hand. The hour markers together with the hour and minute hands are all luminous. Powered by Seiko’s LumiBrite technology, it can suck up the light like a sponge and produce a bright lume in pitch black conditions. Its lume can stay visible after being fully recharged for 7 hours. This makes the watch very reliable for diving and snorkeling, or for simply reading the time when in the dark. For instant readability, a convenient day and date calendar is displayed at the 3 o’clock position. Crystals are a standard for Seiko watches, and the SKX009 is no exception with its Hardlex mineral crystal window. While it’s not as scratch-proof as sapphire crystals go, Hardlex crystals are tougher against breakage so it’s also a good choice for professional use. Case and bezel The dial and its inner works are enclosed in a stainless steel case for scratch resistance and that extra shine. Running along the side of the casing are sleek curves, while the crown guards seamlessly integrate into its design that gives the SKX edition its trademark look. The crown is screwed down, as a professional diver`s watch should be, and smoothly screws and unscrews for easy adjustments. The caseback is screwed-down stainless steel and has a carved Tsunami logo, just like other divers from Seiko. The blue and red “Pepsi” bezel of the watch is also made with solid stainless steel for extra strength. Seiko-SKX009-4a It also has Arabic numerals and indexes that provide easy readability. As a unidirectional, 120 clicks bezel, it can be used to measure short intervals without the need for timing accuracy. Each turn of the bezel gives a ratchet-like click so you can measure elapsed time without looking. Bracelet Seiko-SKX009-6aThe Seiko SKX009 comes with a Z22 rubber strap which repels water naturally, making it ideal for water activities like swimming, diving, snorkeling, surfing, and more. This material is also known to be stain-proof and is easy to clean. It’s also very durable and can last a long time...

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